• By Doug Page columnist
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It’s the Hatfields and the McCoys; it’s the Shiites vs. the Sunnis; the Protestants and the Catholics; it’s the friction between iPhone and ‘droid users; it’s Coke vs. Pepsi.

It’s the great American newspaper rivalry between The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

  • By Douglas Page News & Tech columnist
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This just in: North Korean dictator Kim Jung-un is a heartthrob extraordinaire. That’s the word from China’s Communist Party mouthpiece, the People’s Daily, which reported the news on its website yesterday.

  • By Doug Page columnist
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Read the average blog about the newspaper industry and this business is headed the way of S & H Green Stamps and Kodachrome film — into history’s scrap heap.

Consumers are digital and mobile, says the cry, so it’s time we abandoned the print product, put everything on the Web, throw up a paywall and produce an app

  • By Doug Page Columnist
  • 0

Since 1977, when Harvard Business School Professor Abraham Zaleznik wrote his infamous article about the differences between managers and leaders, there’s been plenty of debate about what separates the two.

As Zaleznik saw it, leaders are “active instead of reactive, shaping ideas instead of responding to them.”

  • By Doug Page columnist
  • 0

Those familiar with reality television likely know “The Super Nanny,” the show starring that British gal who teaches people how to parent their insolent children so they don’t drive them off the deep end.

For those of you bringing up children and continuing to work in what’s left of the newspaper industry, I’ll let you in on a secret: It’ll be a bad day if Super Nanny Jo Frost is at your front door.

  • 1

So if all goes according to plan, within about two weeks’ time, a path guiding Tribune Co.’s exit from Chapter 11 bankruptcy will at last be forged, and, as I wrote back in News & Tech’s November 2009 edition, the company will wind up in the hands of its lenders.

  • By Doug Page
  • 0

Historian Douglas Brinkley, in his new biography, “Cronkite,” writes that the "CBS Evening News" anchorman once suggested, in a private meeting with U.S. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, that the former attorney general run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1968.

  • By Doug Page columnist
  • 0

It’s not the radio, the television, the cable networks, magazines, books, the weather, the schools, the phone, the smartphone or even old-fashioned mobile ones, the tablet, the laptop, Google’s eyeglasses, Amazon, the Internet, the Web’s major portals, YouTube, iTunes, or the Kindle.

  • 0

To: The U.K’s Parliamentary Select Committee on Culture, Media & Sport

Your report on the world’s most successful media CEO is laughable. In fact, it speaks more to the state of the United Kingdom than it does to the condition of News Corp.

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With all due respect to that astute, non-partisan observer of American society and journalism, The Pew Research Center, you heard it here first: Believe the prophecy of digital riches at your peril, especially if you’re a newspaper executive.

  • By Douglas Page
  • 6

Shakespeare suggested we kill the lawyers and let's hope the same fate awaits the newspaper cognoscenti who see a terminal disease in every printed newspaper.

  • By Doug Page columnist
  • 0

Far more intriguing than the phone hacking story is what's happening at Court Murdoch.

The royal family, with emperor Keith Rupert I at its head, is underrated but successful like no other - growing the kingdom from a small newspaper in Adelaide, Australia, to a multibillion-dollar, intercontinental franchise.

  • By: Doug Page columnist
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Life holds two guarantees - death and taxes.

And economics holds another - prices rise, especially when there's an increase in demand.

Except, of course, at Apple Inc., where they're holding the price - and even handing out rebates in some cases - to spur demand, or buy market share, for its iPad2.

  • By Doug Page columnist
  • 1

It’s time to think the unthinkable: life after the iPad.

Because if Apple’s year-old gadget is already killing off the laptop, as some experts say, products are dead before they get old.

Coming into its own in the 1980s and 1990s, the laptop had a glorious life for almost 30 years, before beginning its downward path toward extinction.

  • By Doug Page columnist
  • 0

Forget everything or anything you ever read about Web 3.0, described as the "semantic Web."

Except for a few select eggheads, no one knows what that means and - worse - they can't explain it.

  • By Doug Page columnist
  • 0

With hundreds of millions of people around the world using mobile digital devices — laptops, e-readers, tablets, cell phones and smart phones — and more expected in 2011, newspapers need to compete in an environment where people switch easily from one media outlet to another and are permanently connected to the Web, wherever they are.

  • By Doug Page columnist
  • 0

It's been more than 100 years since English sociologist Havelock Ellis first advanced the concept of narcissism. Today, one might argue, the notion is being advanced by Apple's Steve Jobs, Amazon's Jeff Bezos and other players in the e-reader market.

How will the collision between narcissism, e-readers and newspapers play out?

  • By Doug Page columnist
  • 0

A nagging spouse, screaming kids, a jerk of a boss, needy employees, constant phone calls, the barrage of e-mails and a challenged company — who doesn’t want to escape by going to a trade show or convention?

  • By Doug Page Columnist
  • 0

Anyone who seriously studied business back in the 1980s, including a number of today's newspaper leaders, likely came across Michael Porter, one of the greatest professors to have ever graced the

  • By Doug Page Columnist
  • 0

Without question, Google triumvirate Sergey Brin, Larry Page and Eric Schmidt flipped the world upside down in the last 10 years, showing Internet users nearly everywhere that the globe is without boundaries.

  • By Doug Page Columnist
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Master the poem on this page in one of Mark Bauerlein's Emory University English classes, and you'll likely find yourself in a minority - one of just 13 percent of American adults rated as "proficient" in reading.

  • By Doug Page Dolumnist
  • 0

The manual labor associated with this all-important job demands attention to details. No matter how hard the task is worked, the results are often influenced by City Hall, the weather, traffic patterns, even an editor.

Viewpoint

Douglas Page

Special to News & Tech
E-mail: dpage435@hotmail.com